Valentine’s Day Memes: 8 Hilarious “Roses are Red” Poems

“Roses are red, violets are blue, sugar is sweet, and so are you.” So goes the rhyme that feels about as old as time. In honor of Valentine’s Day, however, users on Twitter have repurposed the age-old poem to speak their own personal truths.

The original poem, according to Know Your meme, “was used to convey messages of love, but many of its derivative versions nullify its sentimental value through subversion, parody and anti-humor.”

The origin of the first two famed lines, “Roses are red, violets are blue,” come from Edmund Spenser’s 16th Century epic poem The Faerie Queene. Given Twitter’s snarky singles put their own spin on the centuries-old rhyme, some of the funniest editions of “Roses are Red” tend to be absurd in the style of internet culture.

Roses are red
Cats are courageous
Anyone with sense knows
Brexit is fiscally disadvantageous…

Roses are red
Violets are blue
Are gross generalizations
Which do not account for species diversity

Roses are red.
Violets are blue.
I’m staying in bed.
Self-love.

Roses are red
Violets are blue
Samuel L. Jackson likes anime

Roses are red…
Violets are red…
Tulips are red…
Bushes are red…
Trees are red…
I set your garden on fire

Roses are red
Violets are blue
Happy Valentine’s Day, Sevillistas
We couldn’t live without you

Roses are red
Rare steaks are too
You cooked mine well done
And now I don’t want you

Roses are red,
Violets are blue,
We hope you spend your with .

While it’s unclear where the current variation on the meme came from exactly, Know Your Meme refers to an August 2016 wave of viral tweets that helped popularize this style.

Typically beginning in the standard “Roses are Red, Violets are Blue,” the memes usually took a turn in which “punchlines are substituted with captioned images and offbeat news headlines.”

In the past few years, Valentine’s Day has been prime target for the “Roses are Red” meme, with everyone from celebrity Twitter accounts to unknown participating in the meme.

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